Schedules are full, demands are high, the notifications are buzzing, plus our goals can grow into lofty lists.

What’s the one thing that will immediately stop you in your tracks and force you to pause your plans? Answer: A health crisis.

Ignoring the warning signs and neglecting to care for your emotional wellbeing is a recipe for disaster.

The time has come to consider and apply the basic tools to care for yourself and gain the capacity to pour well into others.

Here are 5 ways to boost your emotional wellness: 

Sweat More: Exercise is a well-known tool to improve mood and keep your physical body strong. Find fun and creative ways to sweat more and move your body.

Eat Smart: Nutrition plays a huge role in how your mind and body function. Enjoying fresh fruit, colorful vegetables, whole grains, fish, nuts, and minimally processed foods will positively impact your state of mind.

Sleep Soundly: You need at least 7-8 hours of sleep each night. The best step in achieving deep sleep is to start a routine. Decide to create a restful environment, cast your cares on your Heavenly Father, go to bed at the same time every night, and set your alarm to ring every morning.

Listen Well: Listening prayer practice is when you sit in stillness and replace your voice with God’s presence. Biblically, we think about listening prayer as a meditation, where our focus is on God’s Word and God Himself.

Better Together: The Christian life was never meant to be lived in isolation. Whether you are an introvert or an extrovert, God created us for a relationship with Him and with one another. Pay close attention to those relationships that have a fulfilling connection of emotional and relational giving and receiving.

When you invest in your emotional wellness, you become an example of how to honor and care for the life that has been entrusted to you. There is a unique calling on your life that can only be accomplished when you are feeling your best.

By: Dr. Virginia Holeman
Dr. Holeman is the Retired Chair of the Department of Counseling and Pastoral Care, Asbury Theological Seminary.

This article originally appeared on Thrive in 5. Reused by permission.